Aloha From Hawaii Newsletter
Historic ‘Ahu ‘Ula and Mahiole Return to Hawaii
Blue Hawaiian Over Oahu
For hundreds of years, the Hawaiian Islands were populated solely by the descendants of skilled Polynesian explorers who made a home here after journeying across Oceania in seafaring canoes. Their rich culture developed in isolation of outside influence to something totally unique to this paradise in the Pacific.

Then in 1778, Captain James Cook, arrived aboard the HMS Resolution in Hawaii at Waimea on Kauai. This was the first confirmed European contact with the remote archipelago.
Hawaiian Feather Helmet
The following year, Captain Cook returned to Hawaii, this time making landfall in Kealakekua Bay on the Island of Hawaii. The reigning ali‘i (chief) was Kalaniopu‘u, who could trace his royal line to the great chief Liloa of Waipi‘o. In a show of goodwill for this foreigner, Kalaniopuu gifted Captain Cook the ‘ahu ‘ula (feathered cloak) and mahiole (feathered helmet) he was wearing.

Next week these cultural treasures will return to Hawaii for the first time in 237 years.

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No-Joke Portuguese Cooking
Historic ‘Ahu ‘Ula and Mahiole Return to Hawaii
Portuguese bean soup and malasadas are among Hawaii’s favorite comfort foods.  They came across two vast oceans, part of the important cultural baggage of immigrants from Madeira and the Azores. The Portuguese were leaving home for places like Hawaii, California and Brazil because of tough economic times, worsened by a fungus blight that ravaged Madeira’s vineyards. Their soup and holeless doughnuts are just two of the Iberian favorites that got tossed into Hawaii’s international cooking pot when 63 men, 16 women and 35 children arrived in Honolulu in 1878 aboard the sailing ship Priscilla.

Unlike the earlier Chinese and Japanese plantation laborers—who came to Hawaii as single men hoping to return home with substantial savings in their pockets—the Portuguese came with their families, intending to make the Islands their new home. They were mostly farmers, who packed up the ukulele, Catholicism and their favorite recipes. Eventually, an estimated 20,000 came here.

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